Sarah Hepola

Hepola believes that the beautiful thing about literater is that it opens what you thought was personal to a communal experience.

Sarah Hepola shares her story about her struggle with alcoholism at the Mayborn LitCon 2017.
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After many “delicious complications” Hepola has overcome her demons through her first book “Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget.” Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Skip Hollandsworth moderates a discussion with Hepola about her journey to sobriety. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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“You deserve to have a life you feel good about,” Hepola said. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Hepola believes that the beautiful thing about literature is that it opens what you thought was personal into a communal experience. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock

 

Jeffrey Weiss

“I have always tried to write with compassion if the people who I’m writing about are entitled to it.”

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“I have always believed that journalism, if done properly, is at least an incremental benefit to the world,” Weiss said. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Weiss, who has has been a reporter since 1981, now considers himself partly retired after the discovery of his cancer. He continues to write for The Dallas Morning news in his spare time. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Jeffrey Weiss explains to his audience how he used his reporting strategy to learn about glioblastoma, his form of brain cancer, and continues to apply it to treatment plans. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Tom Huang moderates Jeffrey Weiss’ session on telling his personal narrative in the midst of cancer. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock.
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Veteran reporter Jeffrey Weiss shares how he remains positive in the face of cancer at the Mayborn Literary Conference on July 22, 2017. Photo By Alexis Rosebrock

 

Katherine Boo

Katherine Boo urges fellow storytellers to “be serious about being accurate, not trying to make people care.” 

Katherine Boo urges fellow storytellers to “be serious about being accurate, not trying to make people care.” Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Katherine Boo encourages fellow journalists to expect more from their readers at the Mayborn Literary Conference’s Southwest Soiree Dinner on July 21, 2017. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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“The public is more hungry than given credit for,” Boo said. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Moderator Chris Vognar and Boo answer an audience member’s question about the current political climate. Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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An audience member questions Boo about her journey to the slum of Annawadi for her book “Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity.” Photo by Alexis Rosebrock
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Katherine Boo shares her 15 injunctions for writing narrative nonfiction.  Photo by Alexis Rosebrock